Monthly Archives: September 2010

Progress relaxes usage restrictions of GUI for .NET Bridge with 10.2B Service Pack

Among technical modifications Progress has changed the OpenEdge license agreement (EULA) with Service Pack 2. Prior to the service pack the usage of the AVM / .NET Bridge was restricted to the use for building .NET UIs as part of … Continue reading

Share
Posted in GUI for .NET | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Exchange Online 2010 starting tomorrow!

As presenter and booth sponsor of Exchange Online 2010 we are excited that this great and informative event will start tomorrow, Tuesday 14th of September and last until Thursday 16th of September. We are participating with Shelley Chase from Progress … Continue reading

Share
Posted in blog | Tagged | Leave a comment

SmartComponent Library roadmap

We are constantly improving our products like the SmartComponent Library. This is a quick post announcing some of the planned functionality for the SmartComponent Library that we will be rolling out over the next few months. Share

Share
Posted in Announcements | Tagged | 2 Comments

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 8: Conclusion

The OpenEdge GUI for .NET is well integrated in today’s ABL and client products. It’s fully compatible to the classic ABL GUI. Even when many features of the .NET UI are very attractive to the developer and the end user, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , | Leave a comment

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 7: New development using GUI for .NET

New development using GUI for .NET Most Progress partners tend to use the GUI for .NET to improve the user interface of an existing Progress or OpenEdge application. After migrating the existing application to the GUI for .NET with the … Continue reading

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 6: Suggestions and feedback

Feedback on embedded windows: With the WinKit we do recommend the following practices when making modifications to the source code of the windows you will be embedding Share

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 5: Real world expamples

Real world example I: Update Texware / Germany Update Texware, a German Progress partner, is building an ERP system for the textile industry. Their screens are designed in the AppBuilder based on their own framework developed around Progress Version 7 … Continue reading

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 4: Understanding embedded windows

Understanding embedded windows Progress ships two .NET Controls since OpenEdge Version 10.2A to support embedded windows. The Progress.Windows.WindowContainer is a .NET Control that can be used in any .NET design (static or dynamic) and can host an ABL window widget. … Continue reading

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 3: Embedding ABL Windows

Embedding ABL Windows into .NET (and vice versa) The OpenEdge GUI for .NET has been equipped with the ability to integrate ABL Windows into .NET Forms. This core feature of OpenEdge 10.2A and 10.2B was originally added to support mixed … Continue reading

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies Part 2: Parallel use

Parallel use of ABL GUI and GUI for .NET The most basic adoption strategy is the parallel usage of the classic and the modern GUI in a single application. The GUI for .NET is part of normal functionally the two … Continue reading

Share
Posted in OpenEdge GUI for .NET Adoption and Migration Strategies | Tagged , | Leave a comment